August 8, 2014

Link-O-Rama

• Well, this is a first on HardballTalk: "Seth Stohs of Twins Daily reports ..."

• Former general manager turned media member Jim Bowden had a very rough trade deadline and made things worse for himself at every stop along the way.

• I'm so sick of these nerds like Glen Perkins trying to act like they know so much about baseball when they never even played the game.

Gregg Popovich and the Spurs do things their own way and also a great way.

According to the Philadelphia Daily News the Wolves will get Anthony Bennett from the Cavs in the Kevin Love-Andrew Wiggins trade and then flip him to the 76ers for Thaddeus Young.

Phil Hughes gave up a hit to the outfield, but thought it was a line drive back through the box.

Delmon Young's older, much better-hitting brother, Dmitri Young, has lost a ton of weight.

• On this week's "Gleeman and The Geek" episode we reviewed the Twins' trade deadline moves and non-moves, looked ahead to Vargas' future, and I sang way too much.

Chris Pratt rapped the entire Eminem part of "Forgot About Dre" and it was actually decent:

I have zero interest in comic book movies, but I'd love Pratt to become a huge star.

Kennys Vargas is not David Ortiz, as Jesse Lund of Twinkie Town explains.

• On a related note: Vargas really, really doesn't like eating vegetables. "I don't like salad. I eat just meat."

Kate Upton and Justin Verlander are the cutest.

Jason DeRusha interviewed Twins president Dave St. Peter over lunch and I especially liked his quote about Twitter: "If you can filter out the crazy stuff and the people who are looking to push buttons, you can make a real connection."

• Here's my weekly half-hour chat with Paul Allen on KFAN.

Jason Gay of the Wall Street Journal wrote about one of my least favorite (and increasingly prominent) aspects of sports media.

Sam Fuld, now starting in center field for the A's, made a sick full-body throw.

Drew Butera caught Chrissy Teigen's ceremonial first pitch at Dodger Stadium:

Much, much better than the time Butera hung out with Kim Kardashian (and Matt Capps).

• Should everyone be freaking out about how bad Oswaldo Arcia has been against lefties?

• Cedar Rapids will be home to the Twins' low Single-A affiliate until at least 2020.

• Impending free agent Pat Neshek has a 0.78 ERA and 49/6 K/BB ratio for the Cardinals, but says he'd like to stay in St. Louis.

• Brunch spot recommendation: Louie's Wine Dive, which has really good food and $12 bottomless mimosas that actually pack some punch. Go there for dinner, too.

• Some of this week's weird and random search engine queries that brought people here:

- "Danny Valencia defense"
- "Danny Valencia, is he a good fielder?"
- "How old is Roy Smalley?"
- "Ben Revere shirtless"
- "Brian Dozier shirtless"
- "Was Danny Santana supposed to be this good?"
- "Aaron Gleeman brunch"
- "Fattest baseball players"

• Finally, this week's AG.com-approved music video is the original "Forgot About Dre" by Dr. Dre and Eminem:


This week's blog content is sponsored by Uber, which is offering a free ride to first-time users who sign up with the promo code "UberGleeman."

May 23, 2014

Link-O-Rama

Adam Platt wrote a lengthy Twin Cities Business Journal article about my podcast co-host John Bonnes and the rest of the Twins Daily crew. It's worth reading just for the photo shoot.

• Of course Brad Pitt tossed Matthew McConaughey a beer when he spotted him across a balcony in New Orleans.

Dr. Seuss meets Ludacris is magical.

Drew Butera is not afraid to absolutely destroy a little kid in a dodgeball game.

• I have a couple openings in my "Hardball Dynasty" league on WhatIfSports and the new season begins next week. If you're interested in joining, please read this first.

This week's "Gleeman and The Geek" episode included lots of talk about the Twins calling out Aaron Hicks through the media and Brian Dozier turning into one of the league's best players.

Kurt Suzuki's inside-the-park home run that wasn't actually an inside-the-park home run was lots of fun to watch:

Bert Blyleven's laugh afterward is priceless.

Phil Hughes is looking like a very good investment so far.

• "How to Meet the Love of Your Life on Twitter in a Few Easy Steps" is one of the best/sweetest things I've ever read.

Miguel Cabrera in Zubaz and a "Turn Down For What?" t-shirt is very enjoyable.

• Facebook's new "relationship button" seems like nothing but trouble and weirdness.

• Old friend Danny Valencia is now the Royals' starting third baseman.

• Old friend Francisco Liriano is struggling again. Sort of.

• Old friend Justin Morneau is a middle-of-the-order monster again, even away from Coors Field.

• I predict this kid will either go on to live the world's most miserable life or become president:

They should have taken him home, honestly.

Maggie LaMaack is a spectacular dancer.

• Local pizza and beard aficionado Gigi Berry is now contributing to LOLOMG.

• What percentage of people have bitten off a co-worker's ear at work?

• I think I might have found me a good one.

• I've been branching out a little bit more lately, so I made some sweeping changes to the Uptown Bar Power Rankings.

• Some of this week's weird and random search engine queries that brought people here:

- "Aaron Gleeman Twitter"
- "Jared Burton fun facts"
- "Dan Gladden's daughter's wedding"
- "Joe Mauer as a baby"
- "Jim Thome nude"
- "Jon Rauch fastball speed"

• Finally, this week's AG.com-approved music video is "What's Your Fantasy" by Ludacris:


This week's blog content is sponsored by R.F. Moeller Jeweler's repair department, which is recognized as the premier jewelry repair facility in the Twin Cities. Please support them for supporting AG.com.

May 16, 2014

Link-O-Rama

• Being able to "mute" people you choose to follow on Twitter is the most Minnesota thing ever.

• What's with the New York Times being obsessed with Uptown? And will Randball's Stu write a parody article about this one too?

• It's reassuring to know that Jay Z joins me on Team Rihanna.

• Also, if Rihanna and Drake can't make it work what chance do the rest of us have?

Aaron Rodgers is apparently dating Olivia Munn, which sounds fun except he probably has to watch "The Newsroom" in a non-hate watch way.

Jon Hamm is playing in the celebrity softball game at Target Field during the All-Star break so that he can see what a real man like Jim Thome looks like in person.

• I have a couple openings in my "Hardball Dynasty" league on WhatIfSports and the new season begins next week. If you're interested in joining, please read this first.

• On this week's "Gleeman and The Geek" episode we discussed the whole Apple/MLB ruckus that got us kicked off iTunes and how we ended up on Keith Olbermann's television show.

Drew Butera took the mound for the Dodgers and, just like he once did for the Twins, looked like a really good pitcher:

I seriously think Butera should become a catcher/pitcher, ala Brooks Kieschnick. Why not?

Mike Redmond's preference for nude batting practice is always a great story, but especially when it's being told by Vin Scully.

Ben Revere's honeymoon in Philadelphia appears to be over. Great smile, though.

• "Gleeman and The Geek" producer Kate Butler sent me this article literally while she was running our live radio show, so you know it's extremely important.

• I wanna sit around and listen to Richie Havens with Joe Maddon.

Malik Bendjelloul, who directed the Oscar-winning documentary "Searching for Sugar Man" about Sixto Rodriguez, committed suicide at age 36.

Matt Williams and Kirk Gibson are the cutest:

Also worth noting: Gibson cheated.

• It sounds like the Twins have been unhappy with Aaron Hicks for a while and now they're telling the media about it.

Oswaldo Arcia is finally healthy, so naturally the Twins demoted him to Triple-A.

• I found this at my mom's house on Mother's Day, so for any parents out there with a sense of humor ... be careful what you wish for.

• On a related note, this is the best, most fitting picture of me and my mom that I could possibly ever find.

• Some of this week's weird and random search engine queries that brought people here:

- "J.J. Hardy syphilis"
- "First base baseball"
- "Why pou got back to baby size"
- "Kent Hrbek net worth"
- "Leroy Hoard wife"
- "Do feet change shape with weight loss?"
- "Chris Colabello the real deal"

• Finally, this week's AG.com-approved music video is "Empty" by Ray LaMontagne:


This week's blog content is sponsored by R.F. Moeller Jeweler's repair department, which is recognized as the premier jewelry repair facility in the Twin Cities. Please support them for supporting AG.com.

August 21, 2013

Twins Notes: Gibson, Morneau, Butera, Carroll, Mientkiewicz, and Liriano

kyle gibson final start of 2013

Kyle Gibson's first taste of the majors likely came to an end Monday, as the Twins demoted him back to Triple-A immediately following his poor outing against the Mets. Gibson pitched well in his Twins debut on June 29, but was mostly a mess after that and returns to Rochester sporting an ugly 6.53 ERA in 10 starts. His secondary numbers are only slightly more encouraging, including just 29 strikeouts in 51 innings and a .327 opponents' batting average with seven homers allowed.

Gibson got knocked around by big-league hitters and looked worn out at times, so considering the expected workload limit in his first full season since elbow surgery shutting him down soon made sense. He's thrown 144 total innings between the majors and minors and by shutting Gibson down after optioning him to Triple-A the Twins keep him from accumulating MLB service time while not pitching, although certainly the demotion could be purely based on performance.

There are some positives to be taken from Gibson's first 10 starts, including an average fastball of 92.2 miles per hour and a ground-ball rate around 50 percent, but the questions about his ability to generate strikeouts remain and overall he looked like anything but a top prospect. Hopefully he can come back strong next season, because Gibson will be 26 years old in a couple months and the Twins desperately need someone to emerge as more than a back-of-the-rotation starter.

• When the Twins traded Drew Butera to the Dodgers on July 31 for a player to be named later or cash considerations my assumption was that their return would be cash and the considerations would be approximately the cost of a bucket of baseballs. Instead they ended up getting Miguel Sulbaran, a diminutive 19-year-old left-hander with a solid track record in the low minors since signing out of Venezuela as a 16-year-old.

As one of the youngest pitchers in the Midwest League this season Sulbaran has a 3.26 ERA and 86-to-26 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 97 innings. For comparison, J.O. Berrios has a 3.45 ERA and 92-to-34 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 94 innings facing the same low Single-A hitters at the same age. Last year the Twins drafted Berrios with the 32nd pick and he has much better raw stuff, so they're hardly prospect equals, but to get any sort of useful player for Butera is shocking.

Sulbaran hasn't cracked any Baseball America or ESPN rankings, but Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com recently rated him as the No. 14 prospect in the Dodgers' farm system. Mayo wrote that Sulbaran "has a good feel for his low-90s fastball" and "his curveball is his best offspeed pitch and both his slider and changeup show promise." Butera is arguably the worst hitter of the past three decades, so any deal would get the "great trade ... who'd we get?" treatment, but this is a nice haul.

• Parting with Butera is the only move the Twins made before the July 31 deadline, but trades can also happen in August via the waiver wire system and they swung another deal by sending Jamey Carroll to the Royals for the familiar player to be named later or cash considerations. If the Twins get anything decent in return for Carroll that would be even more shocking than the Butera deal, because as a 39-year-old impending free agent he had zero value to them beyond this season.

Carroll didn't work out quite as well as the Twins hoped when they signed him as a free agent in November of 2011, but the reasoning behind the two-year, $6.5 million contract made sense. As usual the Twins' infield options were severely lacking and Carroll was a good, versatile defender with strong on-base skills. He did what he was supposed to do in 2012, drawing the third-most walks on the team to get on base at a .343 clip and starting 30-plus games at three positions.

When signing a 37-year-old to a multi-year deal rapid decline is always a risk and unfortunately this season Carroll's usually outstanding strike-zone control vanished and the Twins no longer trusted him to play shortstop at age 39. He was a worthwhile pickup who couldn't hold off father time long enough to provide a great return on a fairly modest investment. And yet among all the middle infielders in Twins history to appear in 150 games only 10 had a better OBP than Carroll.

• As expected, Justin Morneau passed through waivers unclaimed because he's a 32-year-old impending free agent first baseman with a $14 million salary and a .430 slugging percentage. At this point it's unclear if any contending teams are interested in Morneau, but at the very least no teams were interested in Morneau and the possibility of being stuck with the remaining $4 million on his contract.

Clearing waivers means Morneau can be traded to any team, with August 31 as the deadline for postseason eligibility. However, don't expect much if he's moved. Despite a confusing number of fans and media members continuing to act as if Morneau is an impact player he's been a below-average first baseman since the 2010 concussion, batting .257/.317/.409 in 320 games. This year there are 216 major leaguers with at least 300 plate appearances and he ranks 115th in OPS.

Josh Willingham returning from knee surgery followed by Ryan Doumit coming back from a concussion left the Twins with a roster crunch and they decided to make room by demoting Chris Colabello back to the minors. It's a shame, because Colabello's monstrous Triple-A production warranted an extended opportunity at age 29 and he was just starting to show some promise by hitting .286/.397/.551 with four homers and nine walks in his last 16 games.

Most of the talk surrounding a possible Morneau trade centers on what the Twins might get in return and whether they should try to keep him past this season, but one side effect is that not trading him takes at-bats away from guys like Colabello who could prove useful on a minimum salary for 2014 and beyond if given a chance. Instead, after hitting .354/.432/.652 at Triple-A he got a grand total of 96 plate appearances in the majors.

UPDATE: Well, the good news is that Colabello has already been called back up. Unfortunately it's because Joe Mauer was placed on the concussion disabled list after taking multiple foul tips to the mask Monday. Mauer was dizzy during batting practice Tuesday, which is an awfully scary thing to write following several paragraphs about Morneau being a shell of his former self since a concussion. Brain injuries are impossible to predict, so it's breath-holding time.

• Fort Myers manager Doug Mientkiewicz got into a brawl with the opposing manager Saturday, video of which you can see below courtesy of the Fort Myers News Press:

Because the beginning of the brawl wasn't captured on video it's tough to tell exactly what went on, but by all accounts Mientkiewicz escalated the situation in a huge way by running out of the dugout to tackle the other manager. Twins minor league director Brad Steil issued a statement saying "that's not the example we want him to set for our players" and "he realizes that's not how we want him to represent the Minnesota Twins."

However, general manager Terry Ryan explained that the Twins left any discipline to the Florida State League, saying: "Doug was apologetic. I think it's taken care of." And the FSL merely fined him, providing quite a contrast to the Twins allowing Double-A manager Jeff Smith to bench Miguel Sano four games for showboating on a homer and reacting poorly to being scolded. It's obviously apples and oranges, but imagine Sano tackling another player and only being fined.

Francisco Liriano is 14-5 with a 2.53 ERA and 126 strikeouts in 121 innings for the first place Pirates, allowing two or fewer runs in 15 of 19 starts while throwing fastballs far less often than he ever did with the Twins. Jenn Menendez of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette wrote a lengthy, quote-filled article about Liriano's post-Twins turnaround, including this comment from Pirates pitching coach Ray Searage:

Because that's Frankie. If I try to make Frankie pitch like [someone else], we wouldn't have what we got. That's force-feeding him to do something that he's not comfortable doing. Frankie does pitch the way he pitches. So just let him be him. That's what we did.

Maybe he simply needed a fresh start somewhere else, but "just let him be him" certainly isn't something Twins coaches said often about Liriano and his improvement can be linked to a clear change in approach that runs counter to what the Twins preached regarding fastball usage. He's averaged 9.4 strikeouts per nine innings for the Pirates, whereas the Twins have used 10 different starters this year and none have averaged more than 5.4 strikeouts per nine innings.

• Whatever slim chance Nick Blackburn had of pitching for the Twins again is over following season-ending knee surgery. Blackburn's contract still includes an $8 million team option for next season, but that will obviously be declined. In signing Blackburn to a misguided long-term deal in March of 2010 the Twins ended up paying $14 million for 408 innings of a 5.56 ERA from a guy who would have been under team control through 2013 even without the guaranteed contract.

Darin Mastroianni wound up spending four months on the disabled list with an ankle injury that was initially deemed so minor that the Twins let him play through the pain for several weeks. He eventually underwent surgery, but now that Mastroianni is healthy again the Twins activated him from the disabled list and optioned him to Triple-A. In other words, Mastroianni lost his job because of the injury. And his 40-man roster spot might be in danger this offseason.

• For a lot more about Morneau going unclaimed on waivers and a look at the Twins' options for improving the rotation in 2014, check out this week's "Gleeman and The Geek" episode.


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August 8, 2013

Twins Notes: No trades, botched moves, nice debuts, and bye bye Butera

drew butera twins

Catching up on the Twins happenings while I was in Philadelphia for the SABR convention ...

• Essentially giving away Drew Butera wasn't supposed to be the full extent of the Twins' trade deadline activity, but aside from Glen Perkins they simply didn't have much to offer. It's certainly surprising that they didn't move Justin Morneau, especially given various reports suggesting that multiple teams expressed at least some level of interest, but they weren't going to get more than a marginal prospect for a below average 32-year-old impending free agent anyway.

Morneau has shown improved power recently and it's still possible to find a taker for him between now and August 31, but the waiver system limits options and every game he plays is one fewer game another team can acquire. For the third year in a row the Twins failed to make a significant move to swap veterans for long-term help before the trade deadline, which is rare for a rebuilding team and in several cases stems from their inability to pull the trigger at the right time.

• Butera spent parts of four seasons with the Twins, lasting long enough to get a $700,000 salary for this year via arbitration, which is amazing considering he hit .215/.287/.324 at Double-A and .218/.268/.307 at Triple-A. Plenty of terrible-hitting catchers have solid MLB careers because of defense, but Butera was several steps below terrible-hitting. He hit .182 with a .494 OPS, which is the lowest by any position player with 500-plus plate appearances in the past 30 years:

                    PA      OPS
DREW BUTERA        534     .494
Angel Salazar      932     .500
Brandon Wood       751     .513
Tom Lawless        590     .521
Kevin Cash         714     .526

Comparing across eras can be difficult, but there's a strong argument to be made that Butera is the worst hitter of the past three decades and if nothing else he's the only hitter with 500-plus plate appearances and an OPS below .500 during that time. And based on his minor-league track record that .494 OPS might actually count as out-performing expectations. Not surprisingly the Dodgers sent Butera to Triple-A immediately after acquiring him from the Twins.

• It's tough to look at Aaron Hicks' rookie season and not conclude that the Twins botched things at just about every step along the way. Instead of furthering his development and suppressing his service time by having him open the year at Triple-A they all but handed Hicks the center field job before spring training and rushed him from Double-A to the majors. Based on his 2-for-48 slump to begin the season and subsequent struggles, it's clear that they misjudged his readiness.

In early July they had another opportunity to send Hicks to Triple-A following his disabled list stint for a hamstring injury, but instead abruptly ended his minor-league rehab assignment and rushed him back to the majors after Josh Willingham's knee surgery. He again struggled, giving him a .194 batting average and 84 strikeouts in 81 games overall, at which point they finally demoted Hicks to Triple-A four months into the season.

Being overmatched as a 23-year-old rookie jumping from Double-A is hardly a death sentence for Hicks' long-term potential, although not many struggles are that extreme and allowed to go on for that long. Ultimately he needs to figure out how to maintain a patient approach while also being aggressive within the strike zone, which has been a career-long issue. Because of the demotion he won't use a full year of service time, but this was probably the worst path to that destination.

Andrew Albers joined Chris Colabello and Caleb Thielbar in going from independent ball to the Twins' roster and as if that wasn't already a good enough story the 27-year-old left-hander tossed 8.1 shutout innings against the Royals in his debut. Based on Game Score it was the best MLB debut in Twins history, topping Bert Blyleven's seven innings of one-run ball on June 5, 1970 and Anthony Swarzak's seven shutout innings on May 23, 2009.

Blyleven went on to become a Hall of Famer and Swarzak went on to become a long reliever, so a great debut certainly doesn't guarantee anything. With that said, Albers is definitely an intriguing player. His fastball tops out in the high-80s, which is particularly worrisome when combined with extreme fly-ball tendencies, but Albers is a strike-throwing machine and managed 7.3 strikeouts per nine innings between Double-A and Triple-A. He's still a long shot, but could be useful.

• Albers is getting his big chance because the Twins sent Scott Diamond to Triple-A, completing a dramatic decline for a pitcher many people were extremely excited about this time last season. Diamond's awful strikeout rate always suggested that most of the excitement was overblown and he missed even fewer bats this year along with more walks and fewer ground balls. There are 122 pitchers with at least 300 innings since 2011 and Diamond ranks dead last in strikeout rate.

To have sustained success while striking out 4.3 batters per nine innings a pitcher needs to have spectacular control and induce tons of ground balls. And even then Diamond's realistic upside at age 27 is a lot closer to a left-handed Nick Blackburn than any kind of long-term building block. In fact, comparing Diamond's numbers through three seasons to Blackburn's numbers through three seasons is eerily similar:

               ERA    SO/9    BB/9    HR/9     OAVG
Diamond       4.39     4.3     2.2     1.0     .292
Blackburn     4.14     4.4     1.8     1.1     .293

At least the Twins haven't signed Diamond to a long-term contract extension yet.

Tim Wood, who was signed to a minor-league deal in November and then added to the 40-man roster two weeks later because the Twins suddenly felt worried about losing a 30-year-old Triple-A reliever in the Rule 5 draft, will miss the remainder of the season following shoulder surgery. He never threw a pitch this year in the minors or majors.

Chris Parmelee has hit .301/.409/.466 with a 15-to-13 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 20 games at Triple-A since his demotion. Not as spectacular as his 2012 breakout there, but the guy can hit International League pitching.

Kevin Correia has a 5.90 ERA and .329 opponents' batting average in 17 starts since May 1.

Parker Hageman of Twins Daily interviewed Jared Burton and wrote an interesting article about the right-hander's fantastic changeup.

• For a lot more about the Twins' lack of trade deadline activity and Hicks' demotion, check out this week's "Gleeman and The Geek" episode.


This week's blog content is sponsored by the Twins Daily light rail pub crawl/Twins game, where you can join Aaron Gleeman, John Bonnes, Parker Hageman, Nick Nelson, and Seth Stohs for a day of bar-hopping and baseball on September 14. Space is limited, so book your spot.

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